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Poetry by Rachel A. Gold

Tulum

This is a brief photo tour of the Mayan Ruins at Tulum, Mexico.  Enjoy following these footprints through the tracks of time.

Tulum The word "Tulum" means walled city. This is an approprite title because a massive block wall surrounds this nearly 18 acre historical site on the Gulf of Mexico.
Tulum Tulum was an administrative and religious center of Mayan culture that reached its peak of influence and power between 800 to 900 ad. This view shows the courtyard in front of the major public temple, "El Castillo."
Tulum

The city of Tulum was dedicated to the Mayan God of the "Setting Sun." The best view of the setting sun, of course, was from the public temple known as "El Castillo."
Tulum One of the major reasons for the poor condition of most of the buildings in Tulum is that they were constructed primarily of limestone, which is very porous and therefore subject to erosion caused by weathering. Another reason was that most buildings were constructed without using mortar to hold the blocks together.
Tulum

Looking up the steps of "El Castillo" to the platform where most of the major religious rituals were performed.
Tulum

The Priest's preparation room just to the right of "El Castillo."
Tulum

This appears to be the private home of one of the city officials.
Tulum

This is a special sanctuary atop the Temple of the Descending God. This small room is for the use of the visiting God and the High Priest.
Tulum

This is the major courtyard between "El Castillo" and the Temple of the Frescoes.
Tulum

This is another view of the carving above the door of the Temple of the
Tulum


Tulum

Look into the Temple of the Frescoes and you will see part of the sacred painting inside it.
Tulum

This is a "stelae," a stone monument used to comemorate a special event.
Tulum

This is the major administrative civic building at Tulum.
Tulum

This is the main entrance to the Civic Center, which held the major city offices, such as the Mayor, Treasurer, Tax Assosser, etc.
Tulum

The view of the Gulf of Mexico from behind "El Castillo."

The Mayans say that Time does not have beginning or end, and eternity is an always present instant.

A thousand years from now, what will mankind say of our cities and civilization?


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Tuesday, 04-May-2010 14:47:06 EDT